Department of Education - Learners First

Science

Why do we study Science? 

As a core subject, Science provides students with the skills and means of answering interesting and important questions about the biological, physical and technological world. Studying science enables learners to take informed action in their personal, social and economic lives. The ability to think and act in scientific ways helps build a range of skills in students to ensure students are confident, self-motivated and active learners.

At Rose Bay we have a strong focus on students experiencing science as a dynamic, collaborative and creative human endeavour arising from their willingness to make sense of our world through exploring the unknown, investigating universal mysteries, making predictions and solving problems.

Meet the Science Team 

Nicole Green (Team Leader) Years 8, 9 and 10
Susan Bowler Year 9
Warren Bradley Years 7, 8 and 9
Thomas Coad Years 9 and 10
James Cowley Year 8
Mark Dew Years 7 and 8

Skye Lawler Years 8 and 10
Jacob Lintner Year 7
Kathleen McElduff Years 7 and 9
Sam Meier Years 7 and 10
Jodie Presnell Year 8

Middle School Program of Study

Year 7

Topics and Units of Work Studied

The duration of a unit of work is usually between eight and ten weeks. Topics covered in Year seven include:

  • What is science and how can it help us solve problems?
  • Our place in space and tides
  • Forces and simple machines
  • States of matter
  • Classification
  • Food chains and food webs

In our lessons students are challenged to explore Science, its concepts, nature and uses through clearly described inquiry processes. Students develop understanding of important scientific concepts across the major Science disciplines while establishing the basis of what it means to work scientifically. All Year 7s are offered the opportunity to experience working in the field with a trip to the Marine Discovery Centre to put their classifications skills to the test, investigating Tasmania’s rich marine biodiversity.

By the end of Year 7, students will be given the opportunity to: 

Know:

  • How we stay safe in a science laboratory
  • The skills a scientist needs
  • What makes up the Solar System
  • What causes day and night and what causes the seasons
  • How tides relate to the phases of the Moon
  • Types of forces and what they do
  • What key features can be used to distinguish between one animal and another?
  • Why do we need to classify organisms and give them scientific names?
  • What are dichotomous keys and how do they work?
  • What are food chains and food webs?
  • What are the three main states of matter and how are they different?
  • How does the behaviour of particles in solids, liquids and gases help explain their properties?
  • What happens to particles when substances change state?

Understand:

  • How do scientists find solutions for problems?
  • How can we predict and explain events to do with the relationship between the Earth, moon and the sun?
  • How do forces interact and affect an object’s motion?
  • How diverse is life on earth and how can we order and organise this information?

Be able to:

  • Earn a Bunsen burner licence
  • Plan and conduct your own investigation
  • Collect data accurately and summarise results to form scientifically based conclusions.
  • Model interactions between the Earth, Moon and Sun
  • Measure forces and determine net force
  • Examine evidence for the particle model
  • Explore particle behaviour during changes in state
  • Construct a dichotomous key
  • Model a food web
  • Using and developing simple models to explain concepts

Year 8

Topics and Units of Work Studied

The duration of a unit of work is usually between eight and ten weeks.

  • Elements Compounds and Mixtures
  • Physical and Chemical Change
  • Energy Transfers and managing energy resources
  • Cell to Body system
  • Dynamic Earth

In our lessons students are challenged to explore Science, its concepts, nature and uses through clearly described inquiry processes. A rich array of hands-on investigation, including dissections, chemical reactions and microscope tasks, enable students to develop understanding of important scientific concepts across the major Science disciplines while refining their ideas of what it means to work scientifically. Year 8s are encouraged to further their interest in science by undertaking STEM as a semester option, where they are able to take an integrated approach to projects in a cross-curricular environment.

By the end of Year 8, students will be provided with differentiated opportunities to:

Know:
  • Symbols for the first 20 elements on the periodic table
Understand:
  • An element is a pure substance that contains only one kind of atom. 
  • A compound is a pure substance that contains more than one kind of atom.
  • In any particular compound atoms are always combined in the same proportion and are closely linked by chemical bonds.
  • Mixtures contain different substances mixed together in varying proportions. They can be separated using a range of physical separation techniques.
  • Chemical reactions involve the breaking down and creation of new pure substances. They involve chemical bonds being broken and reformed.
  • Energy is the capacity to do work.
  • Energy transfers involve change.
  • Energy can’t be created or destroyed.
  • Energy looks different in different situations – it can be transferred from one object to another.
Be able to:
  • Perform a dissection and use a microscope

Senior School Program of Study

Year 9

Topics and Units of Work Studied

The duration of a unit of work is usually between eight and ten weeks. Topics covered in Year nine include:

• The Bodies Internal Systems
• Ecosystems and Interdependence
• Atoms and their Particles
• Chemical Reactions
• Active Earth

As students develop a more sophisticated understanding of the knowledge and skills of science they are increasingly able to appreciate the role of science in society. The content of the Year nine programme will inform students’ understanding of contemporary issues such as medical interventions, uses of radiation, and biodiversity.

Students will be encouraged to view contemporary science critically through aspects of the science inquiry skills strand; for example, by analysing, evaluating and communicating.

In addition to their core science programme, Year nines are encouraged to explore and extend their scientific interests with the opportunity to undertake Science by Inquiry, Animal Studies, or Landcare: Food, Fibre and Production as semester course selections.

By the end of Year 9 students will be provided with differentiated opportunities to:

Know:

  • Living and non-living components are interrelated in an ecosystem
  • Interactions between organisms such as predator-prey, parasites and disease, competitors and introduced species
  • The requirements of life and the importance of homeostasis
  • Key components, functions and responses of the immune, nervous and endocrine system
  • Energy can be transferred as waves and particles
  • Features of longitudinal and transverse waves
  • Matter is made of atoms and atoms are made up of protons and neutrons in the nucleus and electrons which orbit the nucleus
  • The charge and relative mass of protons, neutrons and electrons
  • The Earth’s crust is made of separate plates moving slowly in different direction

Understand:

  • Energy and matter flow through ecosystems can be affected by both living and non-living factors.
  • Internal body systems work together to respond to changes in the environment in order to provide and maintain the requirements of life
  • The wave and particle model can be used to explain the transfer of specific energy types
  • Differences in the number and arrangement of sub atomic particles in atoms can be used to explain and predict the properties of matter.
  • Chemical reactions involve the rearrangement of atoms and the law of conservation of mass is always followed.
  • Currents in the mantle drive plate movement and the interactions can be used to explain and predict activity such as earthquakes and volcanos at the plate boundaries

Be able to:

  • Investigate the effect of an abiotic factor on an organism
  • Predict and analyse the consequences of changing components of an ecosystem
  • Model and predict the transfer of different types of energy
  • Use the periodic table to construct Bohr models for the atoms found in elements 1-20.
  • Explain chemical changes in terms of worded and formula equations
  • Investigate chemical reactions important to both living and non-living systems
  • Explain global patterns of geological activity using the theory of plate tectonics

Year 10

Topics and Units of Work Studied

The duration of a unit of work is usually between eight and ten weeks. Topics covered in Year 10 include:

• Hereditary, Genetics and Evolution
• Chemical Bonds and The Periodic Table
• Global Systems
• Conservation of Energy
• Force and Motion
• The Universe

In their final year of their core science programme we encourage students to use their knowledge and skills to critically evaluate a range of contemporary problems, while providing a comprehensive foundation for further study. The content of the Year ten programme will inform students’ understanding of current issues such as climate change, use of resources, biotechnology, and the origins of the universe.

In addition to their core science programme, Year tens are invited to extend their interest in science through the opportunity to study Life Science; a Level 2 TASC course. Science by Inquiry, Animal Studies, or Food and Fibre are also offered as semester course selections.

By the end of Year 10, students will be given the differentiated opportunity to:

Know:

• Earth can be considered in terms of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere
• Carbon and Water can take different forms as it cycles through each sphere
• Human use of resources can impact the amount of carbon in global systems
• The location, structure and function of DNA in cell replication and protein synthesis
• Heritable traits are passed on from one generation to the next through genes and DNA
• The theory of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of living things
• Importance of valence electrons in the chemical properties of elements
• Chemical reactions can be classified by patterns in atom rearrangement
• Factors such as temperature, surface area, concentration and the addition of catalyst can influence the rate of chemical reactions
• Big Bang theory is the accepted model for the origin of the universe
• Where stars, solar systems and galaxies fit in the timeline of the universe

Understand:

• Systems on the surface of the Earth, result from interactions in the atmosphere hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere.
• Genetics and the role of genes and DNA is a mechanism for passing on adaptations from one generation to the next
• The periodic table can be used to predict the properties and reactions of elements
• Different types of reactions are used to produce a range of products and can occur at different rates
• The universe contains galaxies, stars and solar systems and the Big Bang theory can be used to explain the origins of the universe

Be able to:

• Investigate the key processes which cause carbon to move through Earths systems
• Evaluate how human actions have increased the availability of carbon and the potential outcomes.
• Extract DNA using simple laboratory techniques and consider the applications of biotechnology
• Predict and analyse patterns of simple inheritance using punnet squares and pedigrees.
• Use the periodic table to determine atomic structure and model ionic and covalent bonds
• Predict and measure in the laboratory how different factors affect the rate of chemical reaction and explain observations using the particle model
• Examine and evaluate evidence for the Big Bang theory
• Model the life cycle of a star