Department of Education - Learners First

Humanities and Social Sciences

Why do we study Humanities and Social Sciences? 

The Humanities and Social Sciences are the study of human behaviour and interaction in social, cultural, environmental, economic and political contexts.

In the Australian Curriculum, the Humanities and Social Sciences have a historical and contemporary focus, from personal to global contexts, and consider challenges for the future. The learning area includes a study of history, geography, civics and citizenship and economics and business.

Through studying Humanities and Social Sciences, students will develop the ability to question, think critically, solve problems, communicate effectively, make decisions and adapt to change. Students gain a broad understanding of the world in which we live, how people can participate as active and informed citizens and develop the sophisticated skills needed for the 21st century.

Meet the Humanities and Social Studies Team

Jared Richardson (Team Leader)
Charlotte Adams
Gabe Bird
Claire Bugg
Jonathan Cooper
Allison Ford
Andrew Jackson

Moneka Knight
Georgia Park
Emma Potter
Kate Thureau
Laura Trenham
Marco van Buuren

Year 7

Topics and Units of Work Studied 

History – The Ancient World

  • Overview of the ancient world
  • Investigating the ancient past
  • Rome
  • China

Geography

  • Water in the world
  • Place and liveability
By the end of Year 7, all students in History are provided with differentiated opportunities to:
know:
  • about ancient societies, particularly the roles of significant groups and individuals and how historians study them.
  • about past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways.
understand:
  • the effects of change on societies, individuals and groups.
  • how to identify and select a range of sources and locate, compare and use information to answer inquiry questions.
be able to:
  • describe events and developments from the perspective of different people who lived at the time and examine sources to explain these perspectives.
  • suggest reasons for change and continuity over time.
  • sequence events and developments on a timeline.
  • develop questions to frame a historical inquiry when researching.
  • identify the origin and purpose of sources.
  • develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations which:
    • organise and present findings
    • use historical terms and concepts
    • incorporate relevant sources, and
    • acknowledge those sources appropriately.

Year 8

Topics and Units of Work Studied 

History – The Ancient World

  • Overview of the ancient to modern world
  • The Vikings
  • Japan under the Shoguns
  • The Spanish conquest of the Americas

Geography

  • Landforms and landscapes
  • Changing Nations
By the end of Year 8, all students in History are provided with differentiated opportunities to:
know:
  • about societies between the ancient and modern world such as the Vikings, Shogunate Japan and meso-American societies
  • about past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways.
understand:
  • the causes and effects of events and developments
  • patterns of change and continuity over time
  • the motives and actions of people at the time
  • the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society
be able to:
  • sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time.
  • develop questions to frame a historical inquiry when researching
  • analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions
  • identify and explain different points of view in sources
  • identify the origin and purpose of sources and distinguish between fact and opinion
  • develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations which
    • incorporate analysis
    • organise and present findings
    • use historical terms and concepts
    • use evidence identified in sources and
    • acknowledge those sources of appropriately

Year 9

Topics and Units of Work Studied

History – The Making of the Modern World

  • Overview of the making of the modern world
  • Movement of Peoples
  • Making a Nation
  • World War I

Geography

  • Biomes and food security
  • Geographies of interconnections

Year 9: The making of the modern world

The Year 9 History curriculum provides a study of the history of the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. It was a period of industrialisation and rapid change in the ways people lived, worked and thought. It was an era of nationalism, imperialism, expansion and colonisation which led to World War I, which students study in depth.

By the end of Year 9, all students in History are provided with differentiated opportunities to:
know:
  • about societies that formed the modern world, particularly migrating peoples and people who formed the modern nation of Australia
  • about the causes, course and impacts of World War I
  • key events and the actions of individuals and groups to explain patterns of change and continuity over time
understand:
  • the causes and effects of events and developments and make judgements about their importance
  • the motives and actions of people at the time
  • the significance of these events and developments over the short and long term
  • different interpretations of the past.
be able to:
  • sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, with reference to periods of time and their duration
  • develop different kinds of questions to frame a historical inquiry for research
  • interpret, process, analyse and organise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions
  • examine sources to compare different points of view
  • analyse the origin and purpose of these sources, and draw conclusions about their usefulness
  • develop their own interpretations about the past
  • develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions which
    • incorporate historical interpretations
    • organise and present conclusions
    • use historical terms and concepts
    • use evidence identified in sources and
    • reference those sources fully.

Year 10

Topics and Units of Work Covered 

History – The Modern World and Australia

  • Overview of the modern world and Australia
  • World War II
  • Rights and Freedoms
  • Popular Culture

Geography

  • Environmental change and management
  • Geographies of human wellbeing

The Year 10 History curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the mid twentieth century. Students investigate World War II in depth, including the causes, events, outcomes and broader impact of the conflict. Students then examine important developments following this period including struggles for human rights and freedoms plus a focus on popular culture.

By the end of Year 10, all students in History are provided with differentiated opportunities to:

know:

  • about societies in the modern world, particularly the struggle for rights and freedoms for particular groups and the influence of popular culture
  • about the causes, course and impacts of WWII
  • key events and the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time
understand:
  • the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance
  • the context for people’s actions in the past
  • the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives
  • the different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.
be able to:
  • sequence events and developments within a chronological framework
  • identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time
  • develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame a historical inquiry when researching
  • process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions
  • analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes
  • draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources, taking into account their origin, purpose and context
  • develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions which
    • incorporate historical interpretations
    • organise and present conclusions
    • use historical terms and concepts
    • use evidence identified in sources and
    • reference those sources fully.