Department of Education - Learners First

English

As a core subject, English prepares students with the skills they need to enhance knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating texts to become confident communicators. English forms the basis for students’ literacy learning across all learning areas. 

At Rose Bay High we have a strong focus on writing, reading and building students’ independent and critical thinking. Studying English is a vital learning area to ensure students are well prepared to communicate in a range of ways in formal and informal settings. The teaching and learning programs at RBHS balance and integrate all three strands. The study of language (e.g. grammar, punctuation, syntax) is integrated across all year levels.

Language
Knowing about the English language and how it works. For example: the parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives etc.), grammar, punctuation and sentence structure.

Literature
Understanding, appreciating, responding to, analysing and creating literary texts from classics to contemporary novels and poetry.

Literacy
Developing the knowledge, skills and dispositions to interpret and use language confidently for learning and communicating in and out of school and for participating effectively in society. Literacy involves students listening to, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating oral, print, visual and digital texts, and using and modifying language for different purposes in a range of contexts.

Meet the Team

Jaynee Charleston (Team Leader) and Year 10
Nigel Harbod Year 7
Georgia Park Year 7
Laura Trenham Year 7
Charlotte Adams Years 7 and 9
Andrew Jackson Years 7 and 8
Claire Bugg Years 7 and 8

Claire Gluskie Year 8
Daniel Pickett Year 8
Gabe Bird Year 9
Moneka Knight Year 9
Allison Ford Year 10
Emma Potter Years 9 and 10

In our lessons students have the opportunity to engage and explore a variety of texts. They listen to, read, view, interpret and evaluate a range of spoken, written and multimodal texts designed to entertain, inform and persuade. By exploring a range of ideas from analysis of texts and genres, students develop understandings of interpersonal relationships and ethical dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings. Students develop their understanding of how texts are influenced by context, purpose and audience through close reading, guided reading and modelled comprehension skills. 

Middle school program of study

Deliberate planned and regular explicit instruction of writing supports students explore text features and language choices to deliberately craft texts for a particular purpose.  Literary texts that support and extend students in Years 7 and 8 as independent readers are drawn from a range of realistic, fantasy, speculative fiction and historical genres and involve some challenging and unpredictable plot sequences and a range of non-stereotypical characters. A focus on the creation and presentation of a range spoken and written texts that are imaginative, informative and persuasive underpin assessment tasks. 

Year 7

Topics and Units of Work Studied

The duration of a unit of work is usually between 8 to 10 weeks. Units of work have a conceptual and genre focus. Students in Year 7 will study the following topics:

  • Fantasy Genre – ‘A Little Bit of Magic’
  • Everyone Belongs – ‘Kindness Matters’
  • Stories of Survival – ‘Resilience and Resourcefulness’
  • Exploration of the Migrant Narrative – ‘Walls’

In addition to these planned units, teachers are guided by student preference and voice to develop units relevant to the year group.

By the end of Year 7, all students are provided with differentiated opportunities to:

Know:

  • the characteristics and features of narrative and persuasive texts
  • key vocabulary linked to the topics of study
  • how to plan a text for a specific purpose and audience

Understand:

  • the importance of cohesive devices when structuring their work
  • viewpoints about events, issues and characters are represented in texts from different historical, social and cultural contexts
  • writers innovate with text structures and language to influence the readers’ emotions and opinions in different texts
  • vocabulary choices contribute to specificity, abstraction and stylistic effectiveness

Be able to:

  • apply reading comprehension strategies to interpret, analyse and synthesise texts
  • apply a writing process of planning, drafting and publishing narrative, informative and persuasive texts
  • develop well-reasoned arguments and points of view in response to ideas and issues presented
  • experiment with the way in which language features, image and sound can be adapted to achieve the purpose

Year 8

Topics and Units of Work Studied

The duration of a unit of work is usually between 8 to 10 weeks. Units of work have a conceptual and genre focus.

  • Exploring Perspectives – ‘Living In Troubled Times’
  • Animal Connections – ‘Friend or Foe?’
  • Australian Identity
  • Crime Fiction

By the end of Year 8, all students are provided with differentiated opportunities to

Know:

  • the characteristics and features of texts narrative and persuasive texts vary according to intended purpose
  • key vocabulary linked to the topics of study
  • how to plan a text for a specific purpose, audience and effect

Understand:

  • the importance of cohesive devices to strengthen the internal structure of paragraphs
  • differing views points about the world, culture, individuals and are represented in texts from different historical, social and cultural contexts
  • writers’ control and use a variety of clause structures for particular effect
  • vocabulary choices contribute to specificity, abstraction and stylistic effectiveness

Be able to:

  • apply reading comprehension to interpret, analyse, synthesise and evaluate texts
  • reflect on text content by connecting and comparing information
  • apply a writing process of planning, drafting and publishing narrative, informative and persuasive texts that raise issues, report events, advance opinions, and reflect a diversity of viewpoints.
  • experiment with text features and language features to refine, clarify and purposefully develop meaning

Senior School Program of Study

In our lessons students have the opportunity to engage and explore a variety of increasingly sophisticated texts. They interpret, create, evaluate and discuss a wide range of literary texts designed to inform and persuade. These texts explore themes of human experience and cultural significance, interpersonal relationships, and ethical and global dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives.

Students develop their understanding of how texts, are influenced by context, purpose and audience through close reading, reciprocal teaching , developing higher order comprehension skills and opportunities that promote extended student talk about texts.

Through modelling and co-constructing written texts, students are exposed to a range of writers’ crafting techniques to create meaning when writing for a specific purpose and audience. Students plan, draft, edit and publish texts. A focus on creative self-expression through speaking and listening in a variety of contexts, creative and formal writing, and analysis of issues, analytical and persuasive essays underpin assessment tasks.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Years 9 and 10 as independent readers are drawn from a range of genres and involve complex, challenging and unpredictable plot sequences.

Year 9

The duration of a unit of work is usually between 8 to 10 weeks. Units of work have a conceptual and genre focus. Students in Year 9 will study the following topics:

  • Verse Novels– Every Word Counts
  • Life Stories – Memoir Writing
  • Gothic Fiction Genre Study
  • Milestones and Misunderstandings – Relationships in classic and contemporary texts

In addition to these planned units, teachers are guided by student preference and voice to develop units relevant to the year group.

By the end of Year 9, all students are provided with differentiated opportunities to:

Know:

  • the characteristics and features of  texts narrative, informative and persuasive texts vary according  to intended purpose
  • cause and effect, contrasting, concession and emphasising text connectives
  • key vocabulary linked to the topics of study
  • how to plan a text for a specific purpose and audience
  • various language techniques to use to achieve their purpose and engage the audience

Understand:

  • the importance of cohesive devices when structuring their work within a paragraph and across an extended written task
  • roles and relationships are developed and challenged through language and interpersonal skills
  • authors innovate with text structures and language for specific purposes and effects
  • vocabulary choices contribute to specificity, abstraction and stylistic effectiveness

Be able to:

  • apply reading comprehension strategies to interpret, analyse and evaluate information and form interpretations.
  • apply a writing process of planning, drafting, publishing a narrative and persuasive text
  • develop well-reasoned arguments and points of view in response to ideas and issues presented
  • edit for meaning and effect by refining ideas, reordering sentences, adding or substituting words for clarity, and removing repetition
  • experiment with the way in which language features, image and sound can be adapted to achieve the purpose and develop a personal literacy style

Year 10

The duration of a unit of work is usually between 8 to 10 weeks. Units of work have a conceptual and genre focus. Students in Year 10 will study the following topics:

  • Dystopian Genre Study
  • The Power of Protest
  • Monsters in Literature
  • Media Study – Bias and Stereotypes

In addition to these planned units, teachers are guided by student preference and voice to develop units relevant to the year group.

By the end of Year 10, all students are provided with differentiated opportunities to:

Know:

  • the characteristics and features of traditional and contemporary texts in different media have similarities and differences
  • key vocabulary linked to the topics of study
  • how to plan and crat a sustained a text for a specific purpose and audience
  • various language features including nominalisation, clause combinations, technicality and abstraction to use to achieve their purpose, engage and position the audience

Understand:

  • the importance of cohesive devices when structuring their work within a paragraph and across an extended written task
  • Individuals and groups can be represented in a range of ways from different historical, social and cultural contexts
  • Text structures, language features and visual features of texts and the context in which texts are experienced influence audience response
  • Language use can empower or disempower
  • Vocabulary choices are used to discriminate shades of meaning for effect

Be able to:

  • apply reading comprehension strategies to compare information within and between texts, identifying and analysing embedded perspectives, and evaluating supporting evidence ·
  • apply a writing process of planning, drafting and publishing sustained narrative and persuasive texts which reflect  complex issues
  • develop well-reasoned arguments and points of view in response to complex ideas and issues presented
  • edit for meaning and effect by refining ideas, reordering sentences, adding or substituting words for clarity, and removing repetition
  • experiment with the way in which language features, image and sound can be adapted to achieve the purpose and develop a personal literary style